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New copyright law

luke11685

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Sep 13, 2018, 06:37 AM
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New copyright law

Bad news guys European Parliament passed new copyright law.It means if some bot A.I. script YouTube I guess Dailymotion too detect some videos or uploaded music tracks videos will be blocked so according to article 11 and 13 you will need permission from European Union government speaking of that fanarts, fangames and fanmade music tracks re-arangements including music remixes
even your personal photos willl need special permission so licences payments will be probably very expensive.
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Sep 14, 2018, 01:44 AM
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It's definitely a worrying thing. I don't think anyone can really predict how this will play out, but it won't be pretty.
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luke11685

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Sep 14, 2018, 06:28 AM
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I know Miscellaneous Stuff means Jazz Jackrabbit off-topic section,but some YouTube users are making gameplays of fanmade Jazz Jackrabbit 2 level packs sometimes it's level maps from Sonic,Commander Keen,Rayman custom level maps.It's uncomfortable some annoying A.I. YouTube algorytm scripts known as bots so it will report to european union.Now you will need Epic Games,Internet Network Providers and European Parliament permissions to upload YouTube videos of some Jazz Jackrabbit 3D fangames including that 2d ones.Next things are links taxes bills to pay and paying some very expensive licences to publish some fanfics and fanarts.

Last edited by luke11685; Sep 14, 2018 at 08:57 AM.
luke11685

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Nov 21, 2018, 01:34 AM
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It seems today YouTube CEO warned me about article 13th of new copyright law.I heard rumors that YouTube might disappear forever.
https://www.wired.co.uk/article/what...ained-meme-ban
If you'll have polish language in this link just like I have in that case at least you have some videos enclosed in this article.If you wish I can translate into english in case if you could missunderstand my native language.
https://www.youtube.com/saveyourinternet/
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Jan 7, 2019, 10:35 AM
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For instance it seems it's working like if someone is uploading YouTube videos and other users will report to YouTube HQ company they are capable to permamently delete somebody's youtube account for good for example siivagunner's video games music meme gags.There are two messages in my native language settings of my youtube channel there are more accurate reasons why his YouTube channel no longer exists.One in polish(I actually translated it)"This account has been closed due to numerous third-party claims of copyright infringement by material posted by the user".However in second it's less precisely explained "This channel does not exist".Who knows this might be just demonstration of how scanning YouTube ID content might look like in future or it could be something far worse than that.It seems Tor Browser will bypass these new copyright regulations.
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Jan 18, 2019, 06:23 AM
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This post will be quite long(I hope it will make lots of sense) it's because I'll be translating few articles for you it make it sound clear.So here comes more precise and more accurate details how tomorrow Google searching results will look like since 12th september 2018 nothing happened however it was just very loud subject in mainstream media I mean innovative political(centre-left)journalism.The law usually comes into force in 14 days from its publication, although its provisions may state otherwise.So even if law will be passed today or tomorrow we have at two weeks to backup at least our YouTube videos before will be deleted or blocked forever.
ACTA 2 on completion. This is how the search results on Google will look

The copyright directive called ACTA 2 is now being finalized. On January 18, the governments of European states will vote on the proposal of the Council of the European Union before the final proposals.

In the draft directive called ACTA 2, there are always two extremely dangerous entries. I am talking about articles 11 and 13. The first one assumes that Google, other search engines and Facebook would pay websites for the fact that ... their content appears in the search results or on the platform. This would be done on the basis of giants paying the license. Interestingly, even headlines and very short article descriptions would be subject to fees.
However, Google already announces that it most likely only deals with some entities, which will definitely reduce the visibility of other media. In practice, this will reduce access to information.

"Currently, Google is open to all content from both large and small publishers. Thanks to this you can get to know different points of view and topics, published by over 80,000 publishers. The version of copyright proposed by the European Parliament would require search engines to obtain a license, which could force providers of these services to choose which materials will be available in the search results and which will not. Most publishers will probably benefit from this, while smaller traffic will be limited, which will make it difficult for small, niche and new publications to find audiences and generate revenue, "Google says.
https://www.google.com/intl/en/togetherforcopyright/
"Let's explain one thing: Article 11 aims to protect journalists and their work, and we agree with this goal. We take care to support the broadly understood information industry, because journalism is of key importance for the functioning of free democracy. We've built Google to provide everyone with equal access to information. However, art. 11 could change this policy and require online services to include trade offers with publishers to display hyperlinks and short message fragments. This means that search engines, news aggregators, applications and platforms would have to introduce commercial licenses and decide which content to include based on these license agreements and which should be omitted, "said Google News Vice President Richard Gingras.

Interestingly, Google has already conducted the first tests on how search results will look after entering into the life of Article 11, assuming that the search engine will not pay publishers (let us remind you that this is exactly what happened in Spain and Germany).
In addition to article 11, which will undoubtedly destroy the internet as we know it, article 13 will also come into force. It assumes the introduction by large online platforms of the obligation to filter content in terms of copyright infringement. For this purpose, a special algorithm will probably have to be created, which will check whether the content does not infringe the copyright law before we put something into the network. Opponents of the forced law claim that this will lead to the censorship of the internet and, consequently, to its complete change.

The great threat posed by article 13 is evidenced by the fact that MEP of Poland Michael Boni, who had previously supported the entire directive, was against this record.

In the whole matter, the fact that the Polish government is silent as if it is anxious is worrying. We contacted both the Ministry of Culture and Digitization via e-mail and wanted to find out what position Poland has in the whole matter. There has been a week since sending the message, and the answers are still missing.
Timetable for ACTA 2
January 18 - the governments of countries vote on the proposal of the EU council before the final negotiations.
19 January - European protests # StopACTA2
January 21 - the last stage of the trialogue between the EP and the EU Council and the beginning of the finalization of the text

From here, uncertain but probable terms.

March / April - final vote in the EU Council (the exact date is not yet known)
25-28 March, 11-14 April, or 15-18 April (not yet confirmed) - FINAL vote in the EP.
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Jan 22, 2019, 05:10 PM
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Good news guys there are no reasons to get worried.As for now I want to tell you how this new copyright law ended up.First of all news my country blocked this new european copyright law.It's banished for good this so called ACTA 2.0.
The so-called ACTA 2 has been very loud for a long time. Of course, we are talking about the European Directive on copyright in the digital single market and its controversial articles 11 and 13. However, thanks to internet protests, Poland, Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands, Finland, Slovenia, Italy, Sweden, Croatia, Luxembourg and Portugal have created such called a blocking minority.
Thanks to such a turn of events, the voting on the implementation of the directive will not take place and it will not come back as it has been so far (because it is unlikely that we will come back at all). The good news on Twitter was shared by Juliet Reda and Paul Lewandowski.
Some time ago, we showed you what search results would look like after the introduction of the directive. Now we are almost certain that the subject of restrictions on freedom in the network will not appear in the current term. In May, elections to the European Parliament await us. Will the new parliamentarians understand that we do not want ACTA 2 or ACTA 3 or any other European-style network? Let's hope.4 days ago according to this article (it's 02:05 am in Poland so it's 23th January)Across Europe, critics of the EU copyright directive have again stepped out onto the streets. In Warsaw, about 50 people expressed their dissatisfaction with the reforms in the European courts.Well I think that's it for today.
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Feb 11, 2019, 04:18 PM
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Small Internet platforms that visit up to 5 million users per month are to be exempt from the requirement to filter content.

Most likely, the final negotiations on the Copyright Directive between the European Commission, the European Parliament and the EU Council will take place today, bringing together the representatives of the Member States (ie the trilogue). This will be the second approach this year to reach an agreement on the final shape of controversial legislation. The previous one ended with a fiasco three weeks ago, after a coalition of 11 countries - including Germany, Poland, and Italy - did not agree to the wording of two most emotive provisions - art. 11 and 13.. Strong regulations
The first one is to guarantee press publishers related rights, thanks to which they will be able to request from Internet portals publishing fragments of journalistic articles of license fees. The second rule concerns the distribution of profits between creators and intermediaries, especially online platforms enabling their users to post large portions of materials. According to art. 13 the latter would be obliged to conclude licensing agreements with the owners of copyright for the use of their works. Otherwise, they would have to put in place effective mechanisms to detect and counteract violations. In practice, this would mean the implementation of technology for automatic content monitoring. Users whose algorithm would unjustifiably block the material, however, would have a guaranteed path to claim. Governments (including Poland) most unfavorable to the regulations passed in September last year. by the European Parliament believe that they will become a tool for censoring the internet. The exit from the impasse will most probably enable a compromise proposal developed by the government in Berlin with the French delegation. It provides for an exemption from the obligation to actively monitor the content posted therein for websites operating for no longer than three years, showing revenues not exceeding EUR 10 million per year and having a maximum of 5 million unique users.

Lobbic efforts
Small portals that meet all these criteria will only have to adhere to the notice and takedown procedure, i.e. to delete copyright infringing material only after receiving the relevant notification in this case.

- Even if Poland votes against this proposal, it will not be possible to block the draft directive without the German minority coalition - emphasizes Jack Wojtas from the Chamber of Press Publishers (IWP).

Along with the imminent settlement of the EU directive, both sides of the dispute - Internet giants as well as creators and traditional media - have intensified lobbying efforts. After revealing the Franco-German compromise project, the chief attorney and one of Google Kent Walker's bloggers sketched a gloomy picture of the future of the internet on the blog following the introduction of an order in line with the directive. The largest acts are against related rights, arguing that displaying only headers or links in the search results will limit the traffic on publisher sites by as much as 45%. As it appears from Walker's experiment, instead of targeting the pages of press journals, users were more often looking for information, among others via social media. This would confirm the effects that have occurred on a local scale in Germany after introducing there the requirement for Internet companies to pay small fragments of articles.

- Even though German publishers after some time conditionally agreed that their content would appear in Google's search results free of charge, their collective management organization - VG Media - went to court, accusing the US company of abusing its dominant position and breaking the law on copyright and related rights - says Wojtas.As you see another long article,but I guess everything now makes sense,right?
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Feb 21, 2019, 06:13 AM
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YouTube changes the copyright protection system.
YouTube has often turned out to be a minefield when it comes to copyright. This was extremely burdensome for people who treat the Google platform as the main source of income. Incidents related to the abuse of the system of protection of rights regularly happened even to the most famous YouTubers. For example, Angry Joe had cases when his own interviews with game developers were "appropriated" by the publishers of these games. The most ludicrous case was to download a fragment of the game from the old Double Dribble game on NES. This material was used in the Family Guy series 7 years after the original user uploaded to YouTube by sw1tched. After broadcasting this episode on television, FOX used a copyright protection system and blocked material that he used without the consent of the other person. Whoever forbids a rich man, is not he? Either way, YouTube has just made changes to the content blocking system associated with copyright infringement.
According to YouTube statistics, 98% of users never violate the terms of use of the platform, and the remaining 2% of people in 94% of cases do not break the rules again.
One thing remained unchanged - after receiving three warnings, the account is suspended. Google, however, wants to standardize the system of minor penalties with earlier strikes. Previously, at the first of them, there was a 90-day ban on live broadcasts. After the latest changes, the user's account will be frozen for a week. As a consequence, not only livestreaming will be impossible but any uploading of video materials. If the YouTube system detects another copyright infringement, the next one will be valid for two weeks. After 90 days, the infractions are removed. However, if someone calls for the third time - as before - his account will be deleted. Of course, content marked as infringing on copyright will still be removed from the platform.
YouTube has chosen to refresh the copyright policy in response to confused users who, for example, have been affected by the ban on live broadcasts, while copyright infringed other types of content. However, this is not the end of the news - before the strike is awarded, we will receive a minor warning (although the content will also be removed with it). In addition, YouTube is to provide the exact reason for the infraction, and the creators will be referred to the YouTube Guides that discuss this particular case of copyright infringement. Google is also expected to enrich resources related to this topic and offer more information. The changes will apply from February 25.
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Mar 18, 2019, 04:18 PM
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God bless you for fighting the good fight, my man.
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Mar 19, 2019, 01:02 AM
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Well it's just descriptions of how news about this new european copyright laws are spreading across the world. With very little details.
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Mar 22, 2019, 02:27 AM
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Honestly I'm just keep informing you. Anyway now it's time to talk about Wikipedia protests that began yesterday.
I heard in Poland that European Parliament will be working on law changes if it will win votes we can see this law be passed in 2021. Yesterday Wikipedia was started protesting.

The four versions of the online free Wikipedia encyclopedia - German, Danish, Czech and Slovak - were on Thursday for one day excluded in protest against the planned reform of copyright in the European Union.

The dispute is primarily about article 13 of the EU directive on copyright in the digital single market, which is expected to be approved by the European Parliament in the near future. This article decides that all internet platforms - including the smallest ones - are designed to prevent users from infringing on copyright, relating to text or audio materials made available online. This will require "the use of effective content recognition technologies" - which in practice means reaching for the selection software known as upload-filter.

In addition, pursuant to art. 13 Internet service providers are to provide copyright owners with "adequate information" on the operation and implementation of these preventive measures. This is accompanied by an instruction to provide "adequate reports" where appropriate regarding the identification of protected materials.

There are various exceptions in the enforcement of the directive, it will not apply, inter alia, to Wikipedia. However, the online encyclopedia indicate that the upload-filter is susceptible to defects and hacking attacks, and the need for service providers to obtain a license to publish press texts will seriously limit the freedom of information.
The chairman of the Wikimedia Association Czech Republic Vojtiech Dostal believes that the proposed directive will clearly reduce access to sources that are used by authors and editors of the encyclopedia. This will reduce the quality of its passwords.

The European Parliament is due to vote on the directive on Tuesday. If it is adopted, Member States will have two years to put it into practice.
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